Dialysis Patients Looking to Quit Smoking May Be Eligible for Free Counseling Sessions

2019-01-08T16:38:37+00:00November 30th, 2018|Categories: Costs for Treatment, Early Intervention, eNews, What Causes Kidney Disease|Tags: |

Smoking cigarettes can damage your kidneys. Quitting smoking may help your blood pressure, which can lower your risk for having heart attack or stroke. Individuals with high blood pressure have a higher risk of developing chronic kidney disease (1 in 5 adults with high blood pressure may have chronic kidney disease). Medicare Part B covers up to eight counseling sessions centered around quitting smoking during a 12-month period. Make sure your healthcare professional is recognized by Medicare and accepts Medicare’s payment. Visit Medicare’s website for more information.

CDC Advises Patients and Their Families to Be Antibiotics Aware

2018-11-15T00:12:33+00:00November 14th, 2018|Categories: eNews, Medication, News & Events, Treatment, What Causes Kidney Disease, What Is Kidney Disease|

People with chronic medical conditions, such as kidney disease, are at a higher risk of getting an infection, which can lead to sepsis. Antibiotics are life-saving drugs and critical tools for treating infections. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising patients and their families to use antibiotics only when necessary to further reduce antibiotic resistance, the spread of superbugs, and protect patients from side effects from antibiotics. During U.S. Antibiotic Awareness Week and throughout the year, CDC promotes Be Antibiotics Aware, an educational effort to raise awareness about the importance of safe antibiotic use. The Be Antibiotics Aware initiative educates the public about [...]

September is Sepsis Awareness Month

2018-09-24T16:54:55+00:00September 10th, 2018|Categories: eNews, News & Events, What Causes Kidney Disease, What Is Kidney Disease|

Sepsis is a life-threatening medical condition in which the body has a severe response to an infection. Sepsis can result in tissue damage, organ failure and death. Sepsis can happen to anyone. People with chronic medical conditions, such as kidney disease, are at a higher risk of getting an infection, which can lead to sepsis. Check out our webinar from earlier this year to learn more about the relationship of sepsis to kidney disease, the warning signs, risks, and ways to prevent sepsis. Additional Resources National Institute on Health page on sepsis Centers for Disease Control and Prevention page on sepsis

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

2018-12-11T00:33:23+00:00November 20th, 2017|Categories: Early Intervention, Lifestyle, Nutrition, What Causes Kidney Disease|Tags: |

If you have diabetes you are at a higher risk for kidney disease, especially if you have high glucose and high blood pressure. Approximately 1 in 4 adults with diabetes will also develop kidney disease. Your chances increase if you smoke, are overweight, have heart disease, have a family member with kidney disease and you don’t exercise or follow your diabetes food plan. Many people are not aware that they have kidney disease and would benefit from being tested for it. To keep your kidneys as healthy as you can, work with your health care team to keep your glucose and [...]

CDC Helps Patients and Their Families “Get Ahead of Sepsis”

2018-11-14T04:01:39+00:00September 6th, 2017|Categories: eNews, News & Events, What Causes Kidney Disease, What Is Kidney Disease|Tags: , |

Each year in the U.S., more than 1.5 million people get sepsis, and at least 250,000 Americans die as a result. CDC’s Get Ahead of Sepsis education effort encourages patients and caregivers to prevent infections that lead to sepsis and seek immediate medical care if they suspect sepsis. Sepsis is the body’s extreme response to an infection. It is life-threatening, and without timely treatment, sepsis can rapidly cause tissue damage, organ failure, and death. Anyone can get an infection, and almost any infection can lead to sepsis. Certain people are at higher risk including: adults 65 or older; people with chronic conditions such [...]

Lupus and Kidney Disease

2018-11-19T03:43:12+00:00March 22nd, 2017|Categories: eNews, News & Events, What Causes Kidney Disease, What Is Kidney Disease|

Fictional doctor Gregory House usually suspects Lupus first as the underlying cause to his ailing patient. In his case, it’s never Lupus. However, Lupus Nephritis is a very common cause of kidney disease and the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Disease (NIDDK) has partnered with the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NAIMS) to increase awareness of both of these related conditions as part of National Kidney Month. Lupus is an autoimmune disease, meaning the body’s immune system attacks it’s own cells and organs. Because of this, lupus can cause kidney disease which may get worse over time and [...]

Decoding Diabetic Kidney Disease

2018-11-14T04:30:40+00:00February 28th, 2017|Categories: eNews, News & Events, What Causes Kidney Disease, What Is Kidney Disease|Tags: , |

A research team at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has revealed biological pathways involved in diabetic kidney disease. They hope that with these new pathways, early diagnostic tests and targeted treatments can be designed. According to the National Kidney Foundation, about 30 percent of patients with type 1 diabetes and 10 to 40 percent of those with type 2 diabetes will eventually have end-stage renal disease (ESRD). The study focused on the kidney’s glomerulus, which act as the key unit for blood filtration. Researchers studied three different cell types, using two sets of mice. One group naturally developed diabetic kidney [...]

Research Shows Eating More Fruits and Vegetables Cuts Kidney Patients’ Medicine Expense in Half

2018-12-11T01:47:50+00:00October 19th, 2016|Categories: Early Intervention, eNews, Lifestyle, Medication, Nutrition, What Causes Kidney Disease|Tags: , |

High blood pressure is one of the leading causes of kidney disease. When blood pressure is too high, blood vessel walls can thicken and become stiff which can also damage organs throughout the body such as the kidneys. Not only can high blood pressure damage kidneys, but kidney disease can lead to high blood pressure. If kidneys are damaged and can no longer make an enzyme known as renin, blood pressure can be elevated. With continued emphasis on managing and even preventing chronic conditions to improve overall health, research is continuing to occur to find effective interventions to treat conditions such as [...]